Thursday 21st September

Thursday 21st September 2017

07:30-08:45am

Title: East Lake Park Trust Project – consultation, challenges and risks for a charitable trust promoting a multi-million project

Speaker: David Goodman   

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

  1. Explaining the journey challenges and obstacles
  2. Consultation and gaining a mandate
  3. Prefeasibility and risk assessment

Abstract:

The Eastlake Trust was established in September 2014 to promote and drive the development of a community sport and recreational area for flatwater sports in the East of Christchurch such as canoeing, rowing, waka ama and dragon boating. The Trust is a Charitable Trust built from the ground up by volunteers that have worked hard to gain a mandate from the sports and local community to pursue the project. It is currently working with and co- operating with Regenerate on pre -feasibility with a view to the project being included the plan for the Red Zone later in the year. The decision to include or exclude the project is for Regenerate and the Minister. The Trust's Chair David Goodman will present of the Trust's journey over the last 2 ½ years and the challenges for charitable trust promoting a multi- million project.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

11:10-11:55am

Title: Secure project delivery, the future is now

Speaker: Ferdinand Hagethorn

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

Cybersecurity often is an implicit requirement in any project, future proofing from a security perspective is often overlooked. What challenges are we facing and which opportunities can we identify? How to move forward in these fast-changing times.

Abstract:

Have we ever had a project come to a screeching halt because the security penetration test at the end showed major issues with the systems build quality or even the chosen architecture?

The optimum point in time to ensure secure project delivery is in the earliest stages of the project. Initiation and planning have to include the thought of delivering a secure system at the end. This will avoid costly scope, budget and schedule impacts.

As a project manager, we need to be prepared to:

  • Make the product owner aware of any security requirements that might be implicit
  • Guide the product owner (with or without help) to a right-sized level of security
  • Engage and run a project in a secure manner, while keeping an eye out on costs

This presentation will show where to find the opportunities so that organisations can enjoy the benefits:

  • How to get the implicit security requirements explicit
  • Where to shift the security efforts
  • How to determine the right level of effort put into security
  • Future trends & security challenges: Security in IoT, DevOps, and Cloud

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Alone we are smart; together we are brilliant!  How to collaborate successfully – Stabicraft 1600 Fisher case study

Speaker: Jonathan Prince

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

To inspire Product Managers to think outside the box and dare to collaborate! By working together; innovating, collaborating, and leveraging each other’s strengths, kiwi companies have a better chance of success and completing on the world stage.

Abstract:

We are a small country but we punch above our weight on the global stage. To compete, New Zealand businesses need to innovate and collaborate; using our collective skill sets to make collective gains. Sounds great in theory … but how do you make it work in practice?

Caliber Design has accumulated a wealth of knowledge and experience while working on successful collaborations throughout New Zealand. The company has provided mechanical engineering services to multiple industries, including aerospace, materials/food handling, marine, agriculture, robotics, medical, and consumer product design. Their product development experience is as diverse as the industries it serves; conveyor belts to spinal traction beds; food handling equipment to broadcast media camera systems; gumboot driers to trailer boats.

Using the Stabicraft 1600 Fisher trailer boat as a case study, we’ll share the good, the bad, and the ugly about companies working together and making great products in New Zealand.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership:
Strategic: 0.75
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: How to develop Project Managers in order to deliver more successful projects

Speaker: Phil Jacklin

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

Understand what drives a project to be successful, from research and machine learning analyses. Review how this translates to the skills Project Managers need in order to deliver more successfully. Propose a framework for Project Management development that will therefore result in the delivery of more successful projects.

Abstract:

We develop Project Managers along a certain paradigm, principally related to a technical skill set that we believe Project Managers need to be effective (e.g. how to manage risk, effective scheduling, benefits management). Over the last 10 years I have run the world’s largest survey in to what makes projects successful. And it’s not the things we are teaching our Project Managers. Over the last 2 years I have been developing Machine Learning algorithms to explore more closely the relationships between activities carried out on projects and successful projects. We now have a more detailed understanding than ever before over the characteristics that drive a project to be successful. This should change the training and development we undertake and the plans for how we develop the next generation of successful Project Managers. This presentation will look at what the research tells us and the key components that equate to successful project delivery. It will then propose a development framework that should be followed in order to nurture in the next generation, the innate skills needed in order to be successful in project management.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Workshop: Breaking through with benefits management and writing your first business case

Speaker: Youssef Moura

Room: Twiggers

Objectives:

  • Build on last year’s presentation on Benefits Management through a hands-on workshop
  • Transfer knowledge and the ability to understand how Benefits Management works in a practical and ‘easy to adopt’ manner
  • Demonstrate and train the link between Benefits Management and Business Cases

Abstract:

The workshop would be focused on showing how Benefits Management is the missing link between the Business Cases and Portfolio Management. I will show pragmatic approaches to Business Cases utilising a Business Case on a Page. The workshop would be structured like this:

  1. What is Benefits (or Value) Management?
  2. The Benefits Management Process – demonstrate and train in a practical way how we identify, quantify, track and realise benefits
  3. Identification – Explain and train the four key categories of benefits. Through the workshop, the attendees will learn how to identify Benefits in any proposal.
  4. Quantification – I will explain and train how to quantify benefits to help provide the counterweight to the Project’s costs and how this also requires careful estimating. I will also train the concept of Net Benefits and the three classic approaches to financial analysis. Through the workshop, the attendees will learn how to quantify Benefits.
  5. Tracking –I will explain and train the oft-overlooked art of tracking projected benefits. Through the workshop, the attendees will learn how to track Benefits.
  6. Realisation – I will explain and train how and when realisation of benefits typically starts. I will explain the key activities required for Benefits Realisation

PDU Information:

Technical: 1.25
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic:
TOTAL: 1.50

12:00-12:45pm

Title: DevOps – delivering projects faster with quality, helping PMs to support future IC&T innovations

Speaker: Roshantha Polhena

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

This presentation will discuss the importance of the DevOps in delivering projects faster with high quality and what’s in it for Project Managers.  This will include helping PMs to get started with their DevOps delivery.

Abstract:

Whether we are rebuilding after a natural disaster or whether we are building the future of our nation, New Zealand has moved into top gear.  This has led to IC&T delivering more and more innovative projects and the PMs are in the hot seat driving the projects.

It has been seen that almost all the IC&T projects suffer drawbacks when delivering. It maybe the poor quality of the project or delays in delivering which impact heavily on the project budget. DevOps is an emerging concept in the IC&T industry supporting projects to deliver solutions faster and with high quality.

This presentation draws on industry best practices as well as the author’s own experience to discuss the importance of DevOps concepts in IC&T projects and what it can offer to PMs. Key points to be discussed include:

  • Definition and concepts of DevOps
  • Pros and Cons of DevOps in IC&T project delivery
  • Some tips for PMs to get started with their DevOps delivery
  • Tools used in DevOps practice for PMs
  • Future trends in DevOps

The author of this presentation is a certified Scrum Master with a Test & Release Consultancy background including over 16 years of experience working throughout the SDLC.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership:
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Programme management – The practical insights we have learnt for managing more successful programmes

Speakers: Sarah Davenport and Bob Gutsell

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Abstract:

Sarah and Bob have been responsible for managing a number major investment programmes for Fonterra over the last seven years and have contributed to significant changes to the way Fonterra manage large scale investment programmes.

They will share with you their practical insights gained during this time about managing more successful programmes, and what they’ve learned about: key differences between programme and project management, the challenges of moving from project management to programme management, the leadership challenges of programme management, stakeholder & change management insights, our key barriers to implementing learnings and successful benefit tracking & realisation.

Sarah has been managing programmes for Fonterra since 2010, including the Darfield Site Development (winner of the 2013 PMINZ Project of the Year), the new UHT manufacturing site at Waitoa and the Milk Powder Expansion at Lichfield. Bob has been managing programmes since 2012, with programmes including Mozzarella Expansions at Clandeboye and Food Service Cheese at Eltham.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Neuroscientific and Servant-Leadership insights for the reduction of project risk

Speaker: Grant Avery

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

To provide attendees:

  • An understanding of the value of servant leadership, metacognition, and reflection in complex projects
  • Lessons and techniques for motivating project teams and reducing the risks of project complexity
  • Practical frameworks for assessing project complexity and complexity risk factors

Abstract:

Complexity is a growing challenge for project managers globally and the failure rate of complex projects is high. If project managers and sponsors are going to be successful builders of the future they must be able to manage complexity. This presentation explains what servant leadership is, discusses the value of servant leadership to the leaders of complex projects, and presents neuroscientific insights into leadership practices helpful for complex projects. Scott of the Antarctic and Hunt of Everest are presented as examples of what servant leadership looks like within a complex project environment and parallels with major IT-enabled business projects are provided. Recent neuroscientific research on how social pain is experienced by the brain, the damage this causes in projects, and how this can be reduced by servant leadership is discussed. Neuroscientific insights on metacognition and mindfulness, and the value of these to the leaders of complex change are also presented. Lastly, two tools are provided for attendees to use to assess complexity and complexity-leadership potential in their own projects. This is a must-attend session for project managers, sponsors and business leaders alike, looking for new ways to reduce the risks of building the future in their organizations.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

14:00-14:45pm

Title: Agile Transformation of a specialist health service in NZ

Speaker: Jane Farley

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

  • Outline how agile transformation takes place before strategy and remains in alignment during implementation
  • Early buy-in to key improvements/innovations requires strong engagement of both health providers and funder
  • Managing a programme within a programme to ensure additional funding and enable reporting to Ministry of Health

Abstract:

How can a hospital increase its specialist services to meet significant growth in patient events, without having a strategy, well established PMO, or execution framework in place? 

Agile transformation started ahead of finalizing the strategy, by using blended project management disciplines and iterative continuous process improvement techniques. Strong governance coupled with extensive engagement enabled early service improvements, with minimal disruption.  Working with the new PMO, its program framework, using an agilest project management approach will help deliver the strategy by optimization of resources and facilities, with a focus on the people, process, and culture changes. Additional funding from the Ministry of Health came with a need to manage a number of initiatives as a subset with the requisite program documentation for that subset.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic: 0.50
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Understanding the challenges for future smart city project management

Speaker: Bahram Pishravi

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

For developed cities around the world, the concept of smart/intelligent cities is the future. Smart cities are in the development stage, but project managers need to understand the basic requirements when establishing projects, while the development of smart cities is dependent on information technology.

Abstract:

Smart cities concepts have been partially implemented in some parts of the world. Smart implementation is a new area based on information technology that provides different aspects of smart services. Managing a smart city project requires a multi skilled leader, as such a project can be divided into different specialized projects. It is expected that many major cities around the world will become smart in the next couple of decades. Smart city concepts and projects are expanding, therefore we need to expand our views about smart cities project management and understand the basic requirements for managing a smart city project.

This paper will explain the concept and challenges of smart cities implementation and will map some of the project management frame work and structure to the principles and challenges. After expanding the smart city concept, project localization and discovering relevant resources will determine the project focus, scope and cost. Although this type of project normally is large and weighty, agile principles may be used. All these aspects will be discussed and analysed to assist project managers who may be involved in such projects in the future.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Project Leonardo – Pahiatua Development…One Team, One Site, One Culture

Speakers: Paul McGinn and Michelle Jenkins

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Abstract:

Paul & Michelle will share the Leonardo Project story and what set it apart from other projects. Winner of 2016 PMINZ Project of the Year.

Project Leonardo delivered a new 15t/hr Whole Milk Powder Dryer Plant smoothly and safely into an existing facility. 

This plant had to be constructed on an operating site which had two smaller dryers, so a large element of complexity of the project was centred around ensuring continuing operation of the ‘business as usual’ functions on Site during the construction and asset delivery phases; as the Works impacted c.60% of the existing Pahiatua Site. 

In addition from the outset, integration into the site culture and the social connection between site and project was given high priority, recognising that the success of the project was not purely the completion of the physical works, but was also leaving an asset that was integrated with the business and the community at all levels, and in an optimum condition to deliver value to our Farmers and Stakeholders.

The Project was delivered successfully ahead of schedule and under budget.

The success of Leonardo was under-pinned by a culture where “Works Mates Look Out For Work Mates”.  This was not just about safety, it covered quality, environment, costs and time also. It was a new way of working. It was about having a different attitude where collective co‚Äźoperation and collaboration were more important than any one individual or organisation.  Paul & Michelle will share the journey of Leonardo, and how the development of a ‘One Team, One Site, One Culture’ ensured the successful delivery of the project.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Safety in Re-Design – practical lessons in risk management from complex re-engineering projects

Speakers: Alex Martin

Room: Twiggers

Objectives:

  • To demonstrate the interaction of Safety in Design principles within the wider context of project risk management processes.
  • To explore current best practice guidance on Safety in Design
  • To highlight some of the practical differences between ‘greenfield’ projects and those involving re-design or re-engineering.

Abstract:

Safety has long been a priority for the electricity industry in terms of construction, maintenance and operation of assets. Attention has recently shifted to the design phase; e.g. the Health & Safety at Work Act 2015 requires design teams to provide information to end users and ensure their safety. It is also more cost-effective to design out hazards rather than retrofitting solutions later.

Safety in Design (SID) is a concept that is being increasingly referred to within the engineering and construction sector, but there are few examples of how to apply it in practice.

SID is more commonly associated with new asset development, but under the eyes of the law it should be applied to any system or process change.

With hydro power providing over 60% of NZ electricity and with assets up to 75years old, there is an increasing need for the sector to undertake major upgrades of key plant and systems to sustain generating capacity. Along with engineering out existing risks, upgrade projects must avoid creating new ones. 

This paper explores the practicable application of Safety in Design concepts to complex re-engineering projects as part of a coordinated risk management approach to ensure greater certainty and safer outcomes for long-term asset management.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.75
Leadership:
Strategic:
TOTAL:
 0.75