Friday 22nd September

Friday 22nd September 2017

7:30-8:45am

Title: Breakfast Session - An Inside View - The America's Cup Bermuda

Speaker: Ian Taylor

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Abstract:

Ian’s company Animation Research Ltd provided tracking, computer graphics, the mobile app and for the first
time 360 Virtual Reality on each boat for the 2017 America’s Cup race in Bermuda.

Ian will be talking about his experience in Bermuda, an insight into what Emirates Team NZ achieved and
why he thinks they won.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic: 0.50
TOTAL: 1.00

10:35-11:20am

Title: Conflict of Interest Black box: Decoding for project success

Speakers: Amany Nuseibeh, Alankar Karape

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

This presentation’s main objective is to equip project management practitioners “Building the Future” via providing strategies for addressing Conflict of Interest.  Ensuring awareness of the PMI definition of Conflict of Interest; outlining the rules related to conflicts of interest, using real examples to highlight the impacts.

Abstract:

This dynamic presentation introduces the issue of conflict of interest and its impact on leaders and project management practitioners. Conflicts of interest are a common dilemma facing leaders, whether they are project managers, program managers or portfolio managers. As noted in the PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct: "Research with practitioners indicated that the subject of conflicts of interest is one of the most challenging faced by our profession. One of the biggest problems practitioners report is not recognizing when we have conflicted loyalties and recognizing when we are inadvertently placing ourselves or others in a conflict of interest situation."

Conflicts of interest are harmful to both individual practitioners and organisations. The opportunity cost of failing to act to prevent and eliminate conflicts of interest is massive in comparison to becoming a change leader. “Building the Future”, practitioners personal brand, leadership values and behaviors are key ingredients to a successful career. This engaging presentation’s main discussion points include the following: defining conflicts of interest; outlining the PMI rules related to conflicts of interest; using real examples to highlight the impacts of conflicts of interest in practice; and providing strategies for addressing conflicts.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: 0 to 100, the Safe Roads PMO

Speakers: Dave van Staden and Liv Theunissen

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

Share the experience and knowledge gained from setting up a PMO to manage the delivery of a national road safety programme and contributing to the shared understanding on developing and delivering large programmes of work.  

Abstract:

Improving the safety of New Zealand’s rural roads is a key outcome of the Government's road safety strategy. In 2015 the NZ Transport Agency established an alliance, Safe Roads, to deliver an ambitious programme of safety improvement projects throughout New Zealand. Safe Roads has capitalised on the agility of being a start-up entity to deliver on the Agency’s objectives.

Delivering a programme of this nature through an alliance is a new approach for the Transport Agency. This presented the team a number of challenges , including demonstrating value by getting projects underway early, establishing systems and processes “on the run” as well as demonstrating where and how the strategic objectives could be achieved. We will use live examples to show how we are:

  • doing the right thing at the right time
  • replicating successes and avoid repeating mistakes
  • providing visibility to data and information and how we are measuring what was achieved.

The PMO centralises and reports programme progress as well as other Key result areas which were agreed with Safe Roads Board.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Is mindfulness the key to project success? Introducing the calm project manager

Speaker: Mark Jamieson

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

Understand the role mindfulness can play in the project environment; investigate typical project issues in the light of our state of mind; and learn how we can stay calm (and mindful) even when under intense pressure.

Abstract:

First we change ourselves, then we change the world:  Ever since the Standish Group published their first CHAOS report in 1995, the story of project performance has been a sorry one.  In recent years the project success rate has stubbornly hovered around the 27% mark.   Perhaps its time to do something new?  The project management profession has been heavily centred around process, but perhaps its time to look at mindset instead.  In this presentation we look at the project environment through the lens of mindfulness, investigating how our state of mind influences the quality of decision making and the productivity of the team.  But first we start with ourselves, and see how the way we look at things has a profound effect on others around us.  If we ourselves can be in a calm, insightful state of mind then everyone else falls into step.  So this presentation is focussed on you, and how you can be in that mindful state of balanced awareness, especially at work.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.75
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Introduction to Agile workshop

Speaker: Edwin Dando

Room: Twiggers

Objectives:

  1. Introduce PMI members to the underlying mindset behind Agile, going beyond just an agile-as-process view of the world.
  2. Demonstrate how the fundamental values, principles and practices are applied, explaining how they work and why.
  3. Identify and together find solutions to some of the challenges PMI members may face applying agile.

Abstract:

Designed for those looking for an introduction to Agile, this workshop delves into the fundamental underlying values, principles and practices used on Agile projects, explaining how they work and why. Designed and developed by New Zealand’s leading practising experts, this workshop is grounded in pragmatic application of agile from years of application in NZ organisations.

Attendees will learn common terms, potential pitfalls and benefits along with a practical overview of modern frameworks. You will learn what it feels like to work in an Agile way – experiencing many of the challenges you’re likely to face through hands-on exercises, while being coached by a practising field expert. This ‘learning by doing’ style of instruction demands your open mind and active participation

PDU Information:

Technical: 1.50
Leadership:
Strategic:
TOTAL: 1.50

11:25-12:10am

Title: Busting the process mountain and going past normal!  Panel Discussion

Speakers: Iain Fraser, Grant Avery, Sean Whitaker

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

To engage the audience through lively discussion and debate, aspects, and deep insight, on the future of P3M in a wide context eg local, national, and international. Opportunities for the audience to quiz the authors will be maximized via a chairperson to orchestrate a fun, fulfilling and future focused session.

Abstract:

The opportunity in building the future is to embrace innovation whilst be cognizant of learnings from the past. As we enter the ‘age of simplicity’ in a world that is for ever changing and becoming more inter-connected, the need for insight, balance and new skills is huge. In this guaranteed lively panel session three internationally-published NZ authors will firstly summarize their respective books’ thoughts on “busting the process mountain” and on opportunities to innovate change through project management. They’ll also willingly share their insights to answer audience questions around building for the future.

This will appeal to all levels and especially to those interested in changing the norm and strengthening the future.

The authors combined presentation experience amounts to almost 100 years! Therefore they have considerable track-records on sharing their insights with audiences around the world. They will be passionate, provocative and thoughtful about how the PM profession can further contribute towards future society.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Building the way to safer sites: a prequalification solution

Speaker:  Andrew Confait

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

Learn how to improve projects with an innovative tool that simplifies the tender process. Born out of the rebuild, SiteWise is a simple prequalification system that enables project managers and clients to select contractors with confidence. Build a better, safer future by ensuring clients meet their health and safety responsibilities.

Abstract:

The devastating Canterbury earthquakes, and the massive rebuild that followed, posed an immediate challenge to health and safety on site. It quickly became apparent that solutions were needed to help standarise the approach to health and safety across the region. Driven by industry demand, an innovative contractor prequalification system was launched to help cope with the influx of contractors and subcontractors during the rebuild. Main contractors and subcontractors wanted a system that sped up the tendering process, and gave certainty around health and safety capability. The system proved so successful that it was absorbed into Site Safe in early 2015, and eventually rebuilt and relaunched as SiteWise. Our presenter, formerly a health and safety professional at one of New Zealand’s largest construction companies, will use this interactive presentation to explain how project managers can use SiteWise to improve the tender process, and help clients to meet their health and safety responsibilities.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.75
Leadership:
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Carrots over sticks, sustaining positive culture with incentives and integration

Speaker: Matthew Percival

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

The dominant procurement strategy historically has been transactional contracts, what type of arrangement is best for the future?

Create a culture where values and incentives are shared. Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is one option.

Two actual projects are compared by the speaker to highlight the differences.

Abstract:

Major contracts historically have been based on transactions. These are also punitive, if you’re late you get fined, even though you may have nothing to do why you’re late.

Shared value contracts where relationships and trust are built are more aligned with incentives to create a culture of sharing and benefits. Rather than punitive arrangements, incentives are proposed to create a positive culture and win-win situation.

Culture is defined as thoughts and actions or behaviours. How does your organisation think and act? More importantly how does it think and act when dealing with external parties? Does the culture have an element of mistrust?

Good results stem from positive actions, but they don’t just happen. Experiences and beliefs create these actions are form the base of a positive change culture.

A culture of learning fosters curiosity, exploration and innovation. A culture of collaboration may result in high-performing teams. A culture that values families and flexible work hours may result in higher loyalty and lower employee turnover.

A major project here in Canterbury based on transactions is compared to a project in Tauranga based on shared values and positive incentives. The latter is a good example of sustainable relationships.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

13:10-13:55pm

Title: Assessing Portfolio Project Management (PPM) toolsets: Planview, Primavera, Project Server, Clarizen

Speakers: Chris Hubmann and Kelvin Russell

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

To compare and contrast three current leading PPM toolsets.

To provide an agnostic assessment and comparison of specific functional modules across the presented toolsets.

To raise for consideration the types of questions and organisation should be asking when looking at which PPM toolset to implement.

Abstract:

There are an abundance of PPM tools on the market. From large scale and sophisticated on-site toolsets to smaller more, agile but less feature rich cloud based tools.

Which one an organization should choose is an often fraught decision and not one to be taken lightly. Serious thought needs to be given to what the organization’s goals for the toolset are and what areas of value they are looking to add.

This presentation will take three toolsets, Oracle Primavera, Microsoft Project Server and Clarizen (all currently in use by industries in New Zealand) and compare and contrast them across a range of functional areas:

  • Portfolio/Programme and Project level entities
  • Metadata
  • Schedules
  • Resourcing
  • Finance
  • Change, Risk, Issue and Benefits
  • Workflow
  • Reporting 

This will be done as an objective presentation of the various tools relative strengths and weaknesses and is based on a collective 55 years of experience in using and implementing PPM tools across our EPM team. The presentation will not advocate one particular toolset over another but will be focused on trying to provide attendees with tangible list of functional strengths and weaknesses and more generally an idea of what things to consider generally when assessing a PPM toolset for their organization.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.75
Leadership:
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: How to recruit the right people and train them appropriately. A Case Study of client P3M capability from Europe

Speaker: Philip Urwin

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

From a background of projects failing to meet client expectations understand how delivery was improved by:

  1. Getting the right people (internal or external)
  2. And the right development path (internal)

Abstract:

Management Consultants are often brought in to deliver projects for clients and there is little to no transfer of knowledge. Consequently, the client remains dependent on external resource and loses the opportunity to develop internal staff while the consultants lose the opportunity to add more value.

This is a case study from Europe showing how a multi-national organisation successfully used consultants to put in place a programme to identify where they were in terms of PM / PMO maturity and where they needed to be. The presentation will show how the organization used the following to deliver their roadmap to get them to where they want to be in terms of maturity.

  • The differences between competences and competencies. This distinction prepares the client to identify the right internal and/or external project manager or PMO.
  • Specific areas of maturity to measure, e.g. Financial Management, Risk Management, Controls, Governance, Resource Management, Stakeholder Management, Benefits Management, Leadership.
  • Training and transfer of knowledge options

All taxonomies used are in the public domain and clients anonymous so use the presentation as a template with the worked example serving as a standard for good practice.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership:
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Leadership skills and behaviours required to be a successful agile project manager

Speaker: Erika Barden

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

To identify leadership skills and behaviours required for ‘traditional’ project managers to transition into successful agile project leaders and remain relevant in today’s marketplace;

To enable organisations to develop and support PMs wanting to implement agile approaches, to gain the benefits associated with agile project delivery.

Abstract:

As a project management practitioner for over 20 years, and a PMP holder for 10, I had a personal and professional interest in ‘agile’ and a genuine desire to understand what it means.  More importantly, I was keen to determine if agile was just the latest buzz word, or if this ‘new’ approach really could enhance project delivery. 

To explore further, I undertook a thesis on ‘How leaders enable the successful delivery of agile projects’.  After extensive lit reviews, and interviews with agile project managers, I identified some key skills and behaviours that facilitated successful agile leadership and project delivery.  I also found that while there are shared competencies between ‘waterfall’ and agile project managers, traditional project management skills require re-interpretation, and some agile-specific leadership skills are also required. 

Servant leadership is also necessary in an agile environment, and the importance of followership is also key.

My presentation will cover my research findings as well as provide practical recommendations for project managers wanting to move into agile leadership.  I will also include suggestions for managers responsible for the development of project managers, so they know how best to support them and ease any transition tension.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 0.50
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Workshop: We are all brands: the power of personal branding and the art of networking

Speaker: Renee Walker

Room: Twiggers Lounge

Objectives:

Whether you are aware of it or not, you have a personal brand. The question is: is it the one you want? This workshop will explore the concept of Personal Branding: What is it? Why is it important? And how it can be used to build a strong and enduring network.

Abstract:

“Success is not determined by individuals’ internal sets of skills, motivations, and interests but, rather, by how effectively they are arranged, crystallized, and labelled – in other words, branded” (Cheney, Lair, & Sullivan, 2005).

We are all brands. Within seven seconds of meeting you, people are making a judgment of your ability based on your brand. While technical skills can be taught and duplicated, the only thing that differentiates you from the guy sitting next to you is your personal brand.

The Power of Personal Branding will encourage and challenge you to think about whether your personal brand is the one you want and give practical advice and tips on how to manage and market your brand. The Art of Networking: Research shows that 85% of all jobs are secured through networking. Most people acknowledge it is important but very few people truly understand the art of networking. What networking is: strong, authentic professional networks. What networking is not: drinks on a Friday night, or at a conference. Well regarded as someone incredibly well networked, during this presentation, Renee will give practical tips that can be followed to build strong, authentic networks of your own.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.25
Leadership: 1.00
Strategic: 0.25
TOTAL: 1.50

14:00-14:45pm

Title: Driving business performance - what high performing organisations are doing to gain competitive advantage (Research)

Speaker: Gina Barlow

Room: Christian Cullen Lounge

Objectives:

To highlight current project management trends, to demonstrate where project management practices are not achieving planned results and to identify what high performing organisations are doing to gain competitive advantage.

Abstract:

Organisations are responding to a challenging economic environment by deploying scarce investment funds in pursuit of competitive advantage. I passionately believe that the future performance and competitiveness of New Zealand depends on our ability to execute projects effectively, and deliver the expected outcomes and return on investment. Experience and research continues to demonstrate that organisations are failing to consistently deliver these commitments successfully. The required value from project investments is not being achieved, and consequently the disciplines of project and programme management should once again be put under the spotlight. Performance car racing is one of the most complex, highly dynamic and competitive environments you will ever encounter outside of the business world. It’s as much an innovation and technology race as it is about driving, and as such, the practices and methodologies that are delivering the performance improvements on the track are now being successfully applied in the corporate world. There are many similarities between performance racing teams and high performing project organisations and our survey presentation looks into these practices to see how we too can deliver podium worthy projects.

Powerpoint presentation for Sponsors and project management professionals.  I have presented at PMI & other forums previously.

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.75
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: Developing a high performing team – a case study

Speaker: Wayne Dellow

Room: Terror to Love Lounge

Objectives:

  • To explain the different behavioural types and how this can play out in a team environment
  • To illustrate the benefit of strategically appointing project members based on profiling rather than personal preference or personal compatibility
  • To show practical steps to achieving a high performing team

Abstract:

Intro: 

  • The project team that is based on personal choice or compatibility, rather than strategy.
  • What are the fundamentals of behavioural profiling?
  • How can a dedicated, intelligent, experienced group of people deliver a mediocre project, or worse still, fail in delivering a project on time and to spec?
  • Communication, behaviours and project management – how does it all fit together?
  • The project team that is based on behavioural profiling – what can you do differently next time?

Case study: 

  • Client wants to be recognised to be in the top 4 in their sector in the country
  • Step One: Strategic planning and goal setting; how to measure success
  • Step Two: Understanding the team’s strengths and weaknesses- behavioural profiling and work pair analysis
  • Step three: Work shop behaviours – what should stop and what should continue?
  • Step four: Build the team and align to business planning

Goals/motivations:

  • Goal to take the team from good to great
  • Set a goal where every team member shoulder-tapped by an opposition company would chose to stay
  • Recognition as a manager of a team known for its team work, communication, innovation
  • Team to become recognised by the industry, copied, & invited to speak at conferences

PDU Information:

Technical:
Leadership: 0.75
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75

 

Title: A guideline for project managers: Your influence on building a sustainable future

Speakers: Suné de Vos and Mike Roberts

Room: Blossom Lady Lounge

Objectives:

  1. Introduce the P5 Standard to project managers in light of the Global Goals for Sustainable development
  2. Review the impacts of Project Processes and Deliverables on the Environment, Society, and the corporate bottom line
  3. Present recommendations on how project managers can positively influence each of the focus areas

Abstract:

Research shows that as of 2014, 30% of the world’s GDP was spent on projects, forecasts show 40% by 2020. It is clear the world is changing, and as a result, the discipline of project management can’t remain the same.

This session illustrates the impact of Project Management on the UN’s "Global Goals for Sustainable Development" using the P5 Standard (People, Planet, Prosperity, Processes and Products).

We review the impacts of project processes and deliverables on the Environment, Society, and the corporate bottom line and make recommendations for sustainability in each of these areas.

Example: Sustainable outcomes in the “Employment and Staffing” sub category should support the Global Goal: “Good job and economic growth”, which states that by 2030, full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men should be achieved, including young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value.

By engaging staff using appropriate employment types, paying livable wages and using appropriate employment conditions (e.g. parental leave, fair dismissal and work-life balance), the project manager can ensure the sustainable project outcome is achieved.

Project Mangers help achieve this goal by guiding organisations on model employment standards using the P5 standard.

PDU Information:

Technical: 0.50
Leadership: 0.25
Strategic:
TOTAL: 0.75